Strategy of the Week

Six Proven Steps for Effective English Language Instruction

Six Proven Steps for Effective English Language Instruction

When English language instruction is at its best, teachers are designing lessons to support academic language acquisition for all students. Those lessons are particularly effective for English Language Learners when they’re based on an instructional model that involves the following six stages.

  1. Introduction: the warm-up or anticipatory set. Teachers help activate students’ prior knowledge and prepare them for new learning.
  2. Input: the teacher-led direct instruction.
  3. Focus: a quick check for understanding. Can be in the form of thumbs-up/down or fist-to-five questioning.
  4. Transfer: students apply their new learning by working on activities or answering questions independently or in groups.
  5. Evaluation: students report on their learning through teacher check for understanding, whole-class share-out, or presentations.
  6. Extension: students take part in engaging, often hands-on activities that provide additional reinforcement of new knowledge.

English Language Instruction: Changes in the Weather, a video segment in the Edivation library, offers an outstanding example of how these six stages are used in a science lesson.

In this video, you’ll join Ms. Betsy Gomez’s 1st grade class at Agua Caliente Elementary School in Cathedral City, California, and see how her students increase their content vocabulary by using word links and visual reading guides to identify and describe weather conditions. Learning is differentiated as students engage in the classroom’s Equity Access Centers.

The students also review the lesson objectives and associated science content standards before starting their science vocabulary activity.

This video comes with a downloadable guidebook.

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10 Best-Practice Strategies for Preventing Bullying in Schools

10 Best-Practice Strategies for Preventing Bullying in Schools

Despite the heightened awareness in recent years, bullying continues to be a problem that affects students everywhere. According to a recent US federal government report, more than one quarter of American students ages 12 to 18—over 8 million children—were bullied during the school year.

Children who are bullied are more likely to experience depression, anxiety, and loneliness, as well as suffer from physical symptoms such as headaches, fatigue, stomach aches, and poor appetites. And they view school as a stressful environment rather than a learning one.

But there are measures that every teacher can take to reduce bullying in their classrooms and schools. The following best practices come from the US Health and Human Resources website and offer proven strategies for intervention and prevention of bullying.

  1. Focus on the social environment
  2. Assess bullying at the school
  3. Obtain staff and parent buy-in
  4. Form a bullying prevention group
  5. Provide prevention training for staff
  6. Establish and enforce school rules and policies
  7. Increase adult supervision in “hot spots”
  8. Intervene consistently and appropriately
  9. Devote class time to prevention
  10. Continue efforts over time

A thorough examination of bullying, including the latest strategies for dealing with LGBTQ bullying, is available in six video segments on Edivation (search for “bullying” in Edivation).

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Integrating Technology Into Your Instruction

Integrating Technology Into Your Instruction

Technology moves fast, and it can be a challenge to keep up with the best practices for integrating the latest innovations into your classroom instruction. But you can watch some outstanding examples of teachers doing just that—using new technologies to engage and enlighten students in ways never before possible in the classroom. These videos are also great for rounding out your own professional growth goals.

3rd Grade Math: Rounding to the Nearest Hundred

See how students use the Nearpod interactive whiteboard app to learn how to  round whole numbers to the nearest 100.

This video comes with a downloadable guidebook.

Additional videos focus on technology used in teaching – viewable on Edivation.

8th Grade Social Studies: Taxation Without Representation
Watch as students research using their tablets and participate in a role-play of the taxation of the American colonies, posting their responses to the role-play in real time through the Edmodo app.

10th Grade ELA: Multiple Accounts of a Single Topic: Japanese Internment Camps
Students analyze historical documents in text, audio, and video by using their own devices to access QR codes.

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Classroom Management – Intervention and Redirection Strategies

Classroom Management – Intervention and Redirection Strategies

Getting a rowdy classroom to focus on their work can be hard, but doesn’t always require dramatic measures. In fact, some of the most effective classroom management strategies are also the simplest—practical little interventions that redirect students and get them instantly on task.

This week’s video offers examples of exactly these kinds of classroom management strategies, with ideas on how to use physical proximity, gestures, and verbal reminders to get students back on task.

Watch teachers in California and Louisiana as they strengthen classroom management by using these intervention and redirection strategies in their classrooms.

This video comes with a downloadable guidebook.

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Create a Climate for Differentiation – Educational Leadership

Create a Climate for Differentiation – Educational Leadership

A teacher is the keystone for establishing an environment that can foster differentiation.

Cindy A. Strickland suggests, “The classroom has to be welcoming, safe. Kids have to feel that they can take a risk, that they can fail and it’s going to be okay, that growth will be rewarded and is expected. If that’s going to work for differentiation in the classroom, take that out a step and that is what’s going to have to happen. The teachers have to feel safe to take a risk and try something new.”

Watch students, teachers, and entire schools come together to move forward with differentiation.

This video comes with a downloadable guidebook.

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Understanding Equity – Elementary

Understanding Equity – Elementary Setting

Most educators believe all children can learn. However, does this belief extend to all students, regardless of race, economics, language, gender, and ethnic background? This video is part of a larger program that features extensive research into both elementary and secondary schools that have closed or are rapidly closing their achievement gaps.

Watch professionals give systemic guidance and discuss the functionalities of closing the achievement gap. The overriding focus in the framework is driven by:

  • Expectations
  • Relationships
  • Rigor

This video comes with a downloadable guidebook.

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What is your experience with equity? Is equity always equal? What are your thoughts?

Narrating Positive Behavior – Classroom Management Strategy

Narrating Positive Behavior – Classroom Management Strategy

When instructors verbally highlight positive behavior, a student’s clarity level and personal motivation are enhanced.

Watch teachers in New Orleans and Louisiana demonstrate classroom management techniques that focus on narrating positive student behavior.

While mastering these techniques, these educators’ students experienced a positive, constructive reinforcement of instructions and a non-competitive, non-divisive way to highlight student modeling of expected behavior.

Here are some key elements in narrating positive behavior:

  • Begin by giving clear directions
  • Within several seconds after giving directions, describe 1-2 groups/individuals who are following directions
  • Descriptions should be brief and rarely include overt praise
  • Secondary students may prefer group vs. individual attention

This video comes with a downloadable guidebook.[/vc_column_text]Watch the Video in Edivation Join this week's forum

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What are some positive behavior narrations you have successfully used or seen in your (or someone else’s) classroom? Leave a comment below.

Classroom Management Strategy Nonverbal Praise Routines

Nonverbal Praise Routines – Classroom Management Elementary and Secondary

Classrooms thrive when students and teachers alike are engaged in work, effort, and encouragement.

Nonverbal praise routines are a quick, quiet, and simple way to promote student-to-student praise and encouragement that doesn’t interrupt instruction. Nonverbal routines include thumbs up, snaps, and sending “magic.” These routines are excellent ways of engaging students during classroom lectures and activities while building their confidence and self-esteem.

Watch instructors at Akili Academy in New Orleans, Louisiana demonstrate student involvement that contributes to a greater sense of classroom community.

This video also comes with a downloadable guidebook.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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What are some nonverbal praise routines you seen successfully used in your (or someone else’s) classroom? Sound off!

Redirecting Student Behavior – Elementary

Redirecting Student Behavior – A Classroom Management Segment

How does a teacher maintain positive relationships with students while still keeping classroom management a priority? It takes a delicate attention to maintaining each student’s respect toward the teacher.

Watch teachers demonstrate how to uphold respect in their classroom with examples of  how they refocus their students. Their corrective strategies include verbal cues, non-verbal cues, and proximity control. Each strategy is respectful, non-confrontational, and allows students to maintain their dignity.

This video comes with a downloadable guidebook.

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Classroom Management – Class Reward Systems

Motivate Your Students with Class Rewards

One of the best ways to keep students motivated is to implement a class rewards system. And that’s exactly what this Strategy of the Week is all about. In this classroom management video segment, you’ll see how to implement a class reward system, how it will positively impact student behavior, and how to use it to keep students motivated now and all year long.

In this segment, you’ll learn how to:

  • Give rewards based on specific performance criteria
  • Compare students’ performance to their own past performance
  • Generate enthusiasm
  • Administer rules consistently and fairly to all students

This video comes with a downloadable guidebook.

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