Strategy of the Week

Components of a Successful Performance Task Rubric

Rubrics – A Super-Tool!

Components of a Successful Performance Task Rubric 

Imagine that you are settling down after a good day’s work. Unexpectedly, your phone rings. It’s your old colleague Crystal, and she needs your help. Her performance task rubrics have been altered! Can you help save the day?

This superhero style comic book interactive from Edivate’s Multiple Ways to Demonstrate Learning learning experience outlines the components of a good performance task rubric, giving you the tools to help Crystal and save the day!

Components of a Successful Performance Task Rubric

Share out: What is a must-have criterion for your rubrics? Let us know!

Try the Rubrics Tool

**Can’t log in to Edivate or forgot your password? Contact Edivate Support at 855 337-7500 or support@schoolimprovement.com.

Sign up for a free, 30-day trial of Edivate

Jump Start Learning With a New Classroom Arrangement

Jump Start Learning With a New Classroom Arrangement – Try Our Free Tool

Reengage learning with a fresh new classroom layout.

Have you ever looked around your classroom—the desks, chairs, tables, and shelves—and thought, “This place needs a makeover?” If you have, this classroom layout tool can help you plan a room layout that not only freshens your classroom up, but facilitates personalized learning and boosts student engagement.

Creating a brand new floor plan is simple and easy, and you can get started right away by accessing the tool through Edivate’s Classroom Climate learning experience.

changing your classroom

Share out: Do you have a particular piece of furniture in your class that your students really enjoy? What is it and why do they students like it so much?

Try the Tool

**Can’t log in to Edivate or forgot your password? Contact Edivate Support at 855 337-7500 or support@schoolimprovement.com.

Sign up for a free, 30-day trial of Edivate

Diversify Your Formative Assessment With This Interactive Goldmine!

Diversify Your Formative Assessment With This Interactive Tool

 How Do I Formatively Assess? Let Me Count the Ways

As a teacher, you probably have a few go-to formative assessment strategies, like write/pair/share, fist to five, and exit tickets. It’s efficient to stick with the same ones day after day, but in doing so you might miss indicators of student understanding that your current methods don’t measure. So how can you diversify your repertoire?

With the Diversify Your Assessment-O-Tron (DYAOT), of course! This interactive tool allows you to explore a range of formative assessment structures. Click the Randomize! button to generate an assessment option you’ve likely never thought of before. And when one comes up that will work with your students…jackpot!

Diversity Formative Assessment

Try the Tool

**Can’t log in to Edivate or forgot your password? Contact Edivate Support at 855 337-7500 or support@schoolimprovement.com.

Sign up for a free, 30-day trial of Edivate

Using Chants and Songs to Scaffold Content

Using Chants and Songs to Scaffold Content 

What letter comes after “P” in the alphabet? What sound does the duck make on Ol’ McDonald’s farm? How does a bill (sitting there on Capitol Hill) become a law? Once the connection is made, it can be hard to separate a song from its content.

Students are more likely to internalize what they are learning when teachers scaffold the content using a chant or song. This is especially true of English language learners. Watch this 2:00 video to see a few examples of chants and songs in action.

Using Chants and Songs to Scaffold Content

Share out: What is a song or chant that your students enjoy? Let us know what it is and why they enjoy it!

This video comes with a downloadable guidebook.

Watch video on Edivate

**Can’t log in to Edivate or forgot your password? Contact Edivate Support at 855 337-7500 or support@schoolimprovement.com.

Sign up for a free, 30-day trial of Edivate

Making Hallway Transitions Easy and Efficient

Making Hallway Transitions Easy and Efficient

Venturing out of the classroom can be an exciting time for students. They might be going to lunch, recess, the library, or some other interesting location. The actions of excited students can range from a small smile to running in circles and screaming as loud as possible. Depending on what they are doing, some students could be a distraction to their neighbors or other classrooms while transitioning from one location to another.

Establishing expectations and procedures for hallway etiquette will minimize distractions and create a positive school climate. Watch this 2:36 video to learn some management strategies that make hallway etiquette attainable for all students.

hallway procedures

 

Share out: Do you have a unique trick or strategy that makes hallway transitions more efficient? Share it with us!

Watch video on Edivate

**Can’t log in to Edivate or forgot your password? Contact Edivate Support at 855 337-7500 or support@schoolimprovement.com.

Sign up for a free, 30-day trial of Edivate

Depth of Knowledge and Cognitive Demand

Depth of Knowledge and Cognitive Demand

An Introduction to a Depth of Knowledge (DOK) Chart

Differentiating instruction for students can be a tough endeavor – ensuring that every student not only reaches mastery, but also feels challenged and engaged along the way. Norman Webb’s DOK chart is a useful tool that teachers can reference to help choose an appropriate level of cognitive demand for students. But what is a DOK chart? And what does it have to do with cognitive demand? Watch this 1:04 video to find out.

Depth of Knowledge and Cognitive Demand

Share out: How do you help your students reach higher levels of cognitive demand?

Watch video on Edivate

**Can’t log in to Edivate or forgot your password? Contact Edivate Support at 855 337-7500 or support@schoolimprovement.com.

Sign up for a free, 30-day trial of Edivate

Using Technology to Facilitate Learning

Using Technology to Facilitate Learning

How 1:1 Can Lead to Facilitation of Learning

While implementing technology, it can be easy for teachers to focus on the rules and procedures of student use, or for students to only access the tools during designated assignments. But, to take full advantage of the technology, students need a more flexible environment that allows teachers to facilitate student learning by promoting inquiry and incorporating voice and choice in using these tools.

In this 5:12 long video, Ms. Kristi Meeuwse, an Apple Distinguished Educator, discusses how being on the “bleeding edge” of 1:1 implementation helped enable her to be a facilitator of learning.

Using Technology to Facilitate Learning

Share out: How is technology used in your school to facilitate learning?

Watch video on Edivate

**Can’t log in to Edivate or forgot your password? Contact Edivate Support at 855 337-7500 or support@schoolimprovement.com.

Sign up for a free, 30-day trial of Edivate

Teacher Collaboration Through Classroom Video

I’m the Only Math Teacher in My School. How Am I Supposed to Collaborate?

Teacher Collaboration Through Classroom Video

When it’s done right, personalized learning has a profoundly positive impact on student learning. Can the same be said for its use with teachers? For many educators, the answer is…we don’t know yet. In the words of an administrator in this segment:

“We always talk about what education is supposed to look like for students, but we seem to not deliver that to teachers.” 

teacher-collaboration-through-videoTeacher Collaboration Through Classroom Video

This 6:35 video shows how a small district in Georgia found an innovative solution to enable its isolated middle school math teachers to learn from each other.

Watch video on Edivate

**Can’t log in to Edivate or forgot your password? Contact Edivate Support at 855 337-7500 or support@schoolimprovement.com.

Sign up for a free, 30-day trial of Edivate

Silent Communication with Students

Silent Communication With Students? Here’s How.

Talking Chips, Three Before Me, and Parking Lots

As teachers increase their students’ voice and choice in the classroom, they provide less whole-class direct instruction and more personalized, just-in-time guidance. In order to minimize interruptions from other students, teachers develop procedures to strategize classroom communication. See several of them in this 3:08 video.

silent communication

Watch video on Edivate

**Can’t log in to Edivate or forgot your password? Contact Edivate Support at 855 337-7500 or support@schoolimprovement.com.

Sign up for a free, 30-day trial of Edivate

Flexible Pacing: The Treadmill Metaphor

Flexible vs. traditional pacing: What’s the difference for students?

Flexible Pacing: The Treadmill Metaphor

As part of a personalized approach to education, flexible pacing is gaining recognition among educators. There are articles, interviews, and descriptions of its benefits over traditional pacing all over the Internet.

What you’ve probably never seen before is a group of students all running at the same time on a giant treadmill. Why in the world would they do that? And where’d they even get a giant treadmill anyway?

This 1:50 animated video illustrates the dramatic difference between flexible and traditional pacing.

Flexible Pacing: The Treadmill Metaphor

Share out: Does this metaphor ring true for you? Let us know by replying to this email.

Watch video on Edivate

**Can’t log in to Edivate or forgot your password? Contact Edivate Support at 855 337-7500 or support@schoolimprovement.com.

Sign up for a free, 30-day trial of Edivate